Tag Archive for funeral

Should You Discuss Your Estate Plan With Your Children?

There are pros and cons to whether you do or don’t discuss your estate plan with your children, but in many situations it is better that you do so.

It can be a hard conversation to start.  If you, as parents, initiate the discussion, your children may resist because they don’t want to think about your eventual death. If your children initiate the conversation, you may believe that their primary interest in you is how much they might inherit.

In reality, however, you have a lot more to talk about.  » Read more..

Do Your Kids Know Where Your Assets Are?

For various reasons, you may not want your kids to know your financial affairs and other business while you’re still in control, but the day will come when they’ll need to know.

That day may come because you start showing signs of dementia and need their help, or it may be at your death. » Read more..

Why Not Write Your Own Obituary?

Writing your own obituary has several advantages, doesn’t it?

By writing your own obituary, you spare your grieving family the burden of trying to write one within the few days between your death and funeral or memorial service. And, you also influence what you want people to remember about you.

Obituaries are perhaps the one newspaper item that tends to be kept through the ages. Obituaries are sometimes pasted inside the cover of the family Bible, or kept in a family scrapbook. They are a much beloved resource for persons doing genealogy research. » Read more..

The Minnesota Funeral is Over, Now What?

When the funeral is over, search for the Will of your loved one, secure his or her possessions and contact a lawyer.

If there is a Will, your loved one has nominated someone in his or her Will to be the personal representative for purposes of settling the estate. However, no one becomes the personal representative until the Minnesota Probate Court accepts the nomination.

If there is no Will, Minnesota law sets out procedures for naming someone as a personal representative. Again, court approval is necessary.

Did your loved one reside in their home alone at the time of their death? If so, secure your loved one’s home and possessions so that nothing is removed until it is legally appropriate to do so. Park or store the car in a secure area. Take steps to make the house appear “lived in” to help deter theft. Remove any snow from the driveway and keep the lawn mowed. » Read more..